Archive for May, 2011

April 2011 Newsletter

Friday, May 6th, 2011

Click here to download our April 2011 Newsletter!

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Chinook Fund Grant Awards Celebration

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

Join Chinook Fund to celebrate their Spring 2011 grantees! Meet the amazing activists, volunteers, and donors who support social justice movements in Colorado. 6-8 p.m, June 23, 2011

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Sylvia Rivera Law Project, New York City

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

The small things in life that many people take for granted – like using a public restroom – can be a battleground for transgender people. The big struggles in life can be much much worse. A trans woman, who found herself placed in a men’s prison, faced various health risks and constant sexual harassment. She was left with no options and very few rights.

Minustah vole kabrit, a Film by Rachel Smith and Leslie Norville

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

Minustah
This is a story about Haiti in the years preceding the January 12, 2010 earthquake. It is also a story about outsiders, told from the point of view of the filmmaker, Rachel Smith, an outsider who goes to Haiti with a video camera. The film follows Enock, elected president of a community organization in the slum of Cite Soleil, as he seeks development aid for his neighborhood – an area infamous for gang violence. Meanwhile, it shadows two United Nations peacekeepers – Chris (an American officer), and Marcos (a Brazilian soldier) – as they work within the mission, toward its mandate for security and stability in Haiti. Gradually, the local politics and codes of behavior between peacekeepers and locals become more complex. The film asks: Can peace exist in the midst of poverty? At what point does an outsider understand the nuances of a place enough to help? January 12, 2010, the earthquake hits, devastating a country already in crisis. The filmmaker returns to the UN and to Cite Soleil.

Economies of Incarceration

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

A Radio Program by Sylvia Ryerson

The number of people incarcerated in the state of Kentucky has increased by approximately 750% since 1974, growing from 3,000 to 22,500 inmates. As shocking as these numbers are, they reflect a nationwide phenomenon. The United States today has the highest rate of incarceration in the world, with approximately 1 and one quarter million people behind bars today. Such staggering statistics have created what is often referred to as “the prison development boom.” Since the 1980s, as skyrocketing rates of incarceration have continued to fuel the demand for prison construction, it has become widely accepted knowledge that building prisons in economically depressed regions will help promote broad-scale economic growth. Many of these new prison sites are in rural communities. Approximately one quarter of all rural prison construction nation-wide has been concentrated in four regions: The West Texas Plains, the Mississippi delta, south central Georgia, and here in the southern coalfield region of Appalachia.

The Irritable Heart, a film by Richard Poller

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

Leo Rising Productions is proud to present The Irritable Heart – The Story of Sergeant Twiggs, a documentary film that chronicles one soldier’s struggle with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and seeks to unravel the mysterious bond between two brothers that resulted in their bizarre and heartrending deaths. The Irritable Heart goes beyond bare statistics as it explores the personal agony of a dedicated man and decorated soldier who was slowly consumed by the mental illness he developed in service to his country.

Donor-Advised Grantee: Interfaith Worker Justice

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

interfaith worker justice
Interfaith Worker Justice (IWJ) is a network of people of faith that speaks about religious values as a way to educate, organize, and mobilize. IWJ works withing religious communities on issues and campaigns that will improve wages, benefits, and conditions for workers, and give voice to workers, especially workers in low-wage jobs.